Apr. 26th, 2017

gwynnega: (books poisoninjest)
My day began with two excellent things. The first: Charles Payseur's in-depth review of the latest Mithila Review, which includes my poem "family (a form somehow must)."

The second: My finalized WisCon schedule!

This Genre Kills Fascists
Sat, 1:00–2:15 pm
Capitol B
Gwynne Garfinkle (moderator), ANONYMOUS, Alexis Lothian, Victor J. Raymond
Let's dig into the history, the present, and the future of genre fiction as resistance texts. The uses of genre conventions to speak out in ways that would be dangerous if stated baldly in a realist or non-fiction text, the power of imagining a way forward, the issuing of warnings, the rallying cries. The epitaphs and the freedom songs. The voices that endure and the voices that are needed.


Fanfic, Retcon, and Zombies, Oh My!
Sat, 9:00-10:15 pm
University B
Carrie Pruett (moderator), Gwynne Garfinkle, KJ, Victoria Janssen
Let's talk about what happens in the murky territories where fanfic meets original works. Do writings that use original works in the public domain—modern-day Sherlock Holmes characters, zombies in Jane Austen's worlds—count as fanfic? When a series gets unwieldy or unpopular, it can be rebooted or rewritten with different parameters: maybe a character comes back to life, changes gender, or gets a new backstory. Are there differences between retcon and fix-it fic, other than who owns the copyright?


Personal Demons
Sun, 10:00-11:15 am
Conference 4
Carol Anne Douglas, Gwynne Garfinkle, Cath Schaff-Stump , LaShawn M. Wanak
What haunts us, what scares us, what makes us tick. Works that deal with metaphorical and actual demons.


When the Monster Isn't the Monster
Sun, 4:00-5:15 pm
University C
William Paimon (moderator), Gwynne Garfinkle, Leigh Hellmann
Science fiction and horror have always displayed a unique ability to play with allegory and metaphor by making monsters. Sometimes, though, the monster is more than just a flesh and blood (or protoplasm) villain to be defeated. As these genres have had a resurgence over the past few years, high concept genre work has undergone something of a renaissance. From big screen successes like The Babadook, It Follows, and The Witch, to television like Jessica Jones and Mr. Robot, science fiction and horror are finding commercial and critical success by having something to say again. Let's talk about what we loved in works with horrors that are more than meet the eye, note where they fell flat, and share hidden gems we might not have run into yet.

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