gwynnega: (books poisoninjest)
Today's mail brought my contributor's copy of Not One of Us, which includes my short story "Don't Look Back," as well as poetry and photography by [personal profile] sovay and others. I'm very pleased to see "Don't Look Back" in print; I think of it as speculative autobiography, or possibly autobiographical specfic.

In less pleasant news, I'm not at all happy with the latest LJ TOS shenanigans. I am still cross-posting to LJ from Dreamwidth, but I'm not sure how much longer I will continue to do so. I don't post that often anymore, and I use my LJ account mainly to keep up with friends who post to LJ, but the whole thing makes me very uneasy, to say the least.
gwynnega: (books poisoninjest)
I am hennaing my hair on a warm Los Angeles afternoon. I really need to get a haircut before next month's Henna Day, as the process is getting unwieldy.

Last night I watched Daughters of the Dust for the first time, and I'm still wowing about it today.

The other day I finished reading the Feminist Press edition of Violette Leduc's Thérèse and Isabelle, and now I'm once again deeply annoyed that Leduc's letters haven't been translated into English.
gwynnega: (Default)
I'm pleased to announce that my poem "ode to Dwight Frye" will appear in Strange Horizons, one of my favorite publications.

Also, Charles Payseur has reviewed the "Animals" issue of Lackington's, and he had some very nice things to say about the issue, including my story "The Hedgehog and the Pine Cone."

I'd been without internet (aside from my smartphone) and landline since Tuesday morning. My service provider completely dropped the ball, so now I've switched providers. The only good thing about having less access to the internet was a slightly lower daily Trump quotient, but I'm still very relieved to have it back.
gwynnega: (books poisoninjest)
My story "The Hedgehog and the Pine Cone," which came out last autumn in the "Animals" issue of Lackington's, is now available to read online.

It feels somewhat strange to post about something unrelated to politics these days.

Meanwhile, this week I am listening to Slim Gaillard for the first time in years, and I highly recommend it.

Stay warm, friends in the path of the snow!
gwynnega: (Default)
I am hennaing my hair on a cool, overcast LA afternoon. (Rain is coming tonight. We've been having way more rain this winter than we've had in ages.)

Trump has been our so-called president for just over two weeks, though it feels like a lot longer. I am heartened by the pushback against his agenda, both in the streets and in the courts.

I've been playing this song a lot.
gwynnega: (Default)
It is Henna Day, on the warmest, sunniest day we've had in awhile. (We're supposed to get more rain and cool temps this week.)

Yesterday I saw the long-awaited Hidden Figures at my local movie theater. It made me cry a few times. As Lisa Bolekaja said on Twitter, the film "shows how racism (plus sexism sprinkled in) holds America back. Although a historical drama, it's really talking to 2017." The film seems more necessary than ever just now, with Trump's inauguration (I can barely type the words) less than two weeks away.
gwynnega: (books poisoninjest)
My poem "family (a form somehow must)" (my "weird Brady Bunch" poem) will appear in the April issue of the beautiful Mithila Review. It's my first sale to this publication, as well as my first writing sale of the new year, and I'm very pleased about it.

Meanwhile, this morning the GOP caved to public pressure and reversed its attempt to gut its independent ethics office. It's just one battle, but a heartening development nonetheless. In this uncertain time, I am all for heartening developments.
gwynnega: (books poisoninjest)
I thought this was coming out in 2017, but here is my poem "The Last Word" (an homage to Colin Clive) in the winter issue of Kaleidotrope.

It feels good to see the year out with the publication of a monster movie poem, despite the dread of Looming Trump.

Also, it is Patti Smith's 70th birthday. I am deeply grateful for Patti's continued presence in the world. Seeing her perform at the Hollywood Bowl in October (so long ago, it seems!) with Lyman was one of the highlights of my year.
gwynnega: (books poisoninjest)
short fiction

"The Hedgehog and the Pine Cone" in Lackington's issue 12 (Fall 2016)


poetry

"Allison Gross Speaks of the Worm" (reprint; originally published in Aberrant Dreams) in Angels of the Meanwhile

"Poetess Strikes Again" in The Cascadia Subduction Zone (Vol. 6, No. 2, April 2016)

"song for Mary Henry" in Through the Gate (June 28 2016)

"Champagne Ivy" in Mythic Delirium (3.2, Oct.-Dec. 2016)

"Una O'Connor unleashes her scream" in The Cascadia Subduction Zone (Vol. 6, No. 4, October 2016)

"People Change: A Love Story" and "Linda Blair Pantoum" (plus an interview in Postscripts to Darkness (November 6 2016)

"The Last Word" in Kaleidotrope (Winter 2017, but published December 2016)
gwynnega: (books poisoninjest)
I am hennaing my hair on an autumnal LA afternoon. The political situation continues to evolve in alarming and surreal ways. It's shaping up to be a very strange holiday season.

I finally finished reading the wonderful Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life, which I began before the election. I'm not sure what I feel like reading next, which is to say I'm not sure what will keep my attention off of politics for more than a few minutes at a time.

I probably should be watching a lot more horror movies.
gwynnega: (coffee poisoninjest)
I am hennaing my hair on an unseasonably warm Los Angeles November afternoon.

I keep composing blog posts in my head about the election and all its possible horrible ramifications, but I seem to have too much to say to say any of it at the moment. Yesterday I got my hair cut, and everyone at the salon (me included) was talking about the awfulness of the election. Then I went to the Iliad Bookstore, and the owner was talking with customers about the international implications of the election. As they wound up their chat, the owner said, "I was doing okay, but then you started talking." I know what he meant. At least I got to see the bookstore's two cats snoozing peacefully on top of cardboard boxes, and I bought Boris Karloff and His Films by Paul M. Jensen (1974).

I keep thinking of appropriate music for the moment--songs like "Save the Country" by Laura Nyro and "People Have the Power" by Patti Smith. But the music that seems to help me the most right now is Yoko Ono/Plastic Ono Band (1970) and Yoko's live version of "Don't Worry Kyoko" from Sometime in New York City (1972). I've tended to prefer Yoko's more melodic work, but now it's her screaming that resonates.

not okay

Nov. 9th, 2016 09:42 am
gwynnega: (books poisoninjest)
I slept badly last night after learning the election results. Today I have a headache and stomach ache, and I am full of despair and horror.
gwynnega: (books poisoninjest)
My poetry feature is up at Postscripts to Darkness. It includes two poems ("People Change: A Love Story," beautifully illustrated by Carrion House, and "Linda Blair Pantoum"), plus an interview I did with Sean Moreland, in which I talk about, among other things, poetry and horror movies and poetry about horror movies.

The election is tomorrow. I am veering wildly between apprehension and cautious optimism.
gwynnega: (books poisoninjest)
My poem "Champagne Ivy," inspired by Rouben Mamoulian's 1931 film of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, is now live at Mythic Delirium.

Here are a couple of terrific interviews with two of my favorite writers: Marilyn Hacker on Moving Between Poetry and Translation and Interview with Dodie Bellamy.
gwynnega: (books poisoninjest)
The "Animals" issue of Lackington's is out. It includes my story "The Hedgehog and the Pine Cone," with a beautiful illustration by Dotti Price.

We've been having a spate of lovely autumn weather--so of course we're about to have a mini heat wave. Meanwhile, this horrific election season is almost over. I've already voted for Hillary Clinton, and I'm a bundle of pre-election nerves (but it feels like that's been true for months).
gwynnega: (books poisoninjest)
My poem "Una O'Connor unleashes her scream" appears in the new issue of The Cascadia Subduction Zone. The issue also includes poetry by [personal profile] sovay and an essay by L. Timmel Duchamp on Chris Kraus’s I Love Dick.

Also, the April 2016 issue of CSZ is now available as a free PDF; it includes my poem "Poetess Strikes Again."

I'm delighted that my poems "People Change: A Love Story" and "Linda Blair Pantoum" will appear in Postscripts to Darkness. They (like "Una O'Connor") are part of my horror movie poetry project.

It actually rained in Los Angeles last night. I woke up during the night, and it took me a couple of minutes to register what the "water dripping" sound signified. (I guess it's been awhile since we've had any rain.)

Here, have a clip of Una O'Connor unleashing her scream in The Invisible Man.
gwynnega: (coffee poisoninjest)
It is Henna Day, in the midst of a spate of lovely autumnal LA days. (Another heat wave is scheduled for later this week.) Yesterday I baked pumpkin scones (from a Trader Joe's mix), and they are delicious.

The election is three weeks away, and I'm on edge, though at least the polls are encouraging.

I'm enjoying the new Shirley Jackson biography (Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life by Ruth Franklin), which is full of amazing information, such as the fact that "Jackson tried to structure a story around a potato kugel recipe."
gwynnega: (books poisoninjest)
The autumn issue of Mythic Delirium is here. It includes my poem "Champagne Ivy," inspired by Rouben Mamoulian's 1931 film of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (available now to subscribers, and online in November).

I am happy it is October, in spite of this terrifying election season. Here, have a guide to TCM's October horror offerings.
gwynnega: (books poisoninjest)
My story "Don't Look Back" will appear in Not One of Us in 2017. It's a first-time sale to a publication I greatly admire.

It is officially autumn, so of course we are bracing for another heat wave. But my kitchen is well-stocked with pumpkin products.

I am finally reading Gemma Files' Experimental Film, and it's even more brilliant than I had been led to believe.
gwynnega: (coffee poisoninjest)
I am hennaing my hair on a warm Los Angeles afternoon. We had a few lovely fall-esque days. Now another heat wave looms. We'll probably have a few of those before actual autumn sets in.

The other night I watched Tomorrow, the World! (1944) on TCM. I joked that it's "The Bad Seed, Hitler Youth edition," but the two films have some striking parallels. Both are based on Broadway shows; both feature electrifying performances by child actors recreating their Broadway roles; both center around "bad" kids. Unlike Patty McCormack's Rhoda, Skip Homeier's Emil wasn't "born bad"; a German war orphan whose father died opposing the Nazis, Emil has been thoroughly steeped in Nazi ideology (including a giant helping of misogyny). He comes to live with his American uncle, a university professor (played in the film by Fredric March; Ralph Bellamy played him in the Broadway production). When Emil learns his uncle's fiancée is Jewish, he remarks, "That is...regrettable," and things go downhill from there, as he wreaks havoc at home, school, and in the neighborhood. Emil is clever and calculating, both mature beyond his years and an insufferable brat; his repudiation of his father masks a grief he's stuffed so far down, it seems nearly irretrievable. The film hinges upon Homeier's performance, and it's a remarkable one. (It doesn't look like the film is available on DVD, but it's showing on TCM On Demand through September 23.)

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